30 October 2013

My Tony Romo at the Lead & Succeed 2013 DFW Experience

Yesterday I went to LEAD AND SUCCEED 2013 at the Verizon Theater on the edge of Grapevine and Dallas, Texas. There were some great speakers, and it was nice that the majority were good to point out that possessions become idols and that the reason to get rich is to help others, and that when you help others you find true happiness. The message of forgiveness was taught too, saying revenge was just giving yourself poison and hoping the other person dies from it.

Unfortunately there were some negative aspects. People were supposed to tweet and post on Facebook during the event, but unless you were using a Verizon 4G phone, you most likely did not have any kind of signal. People on T-Mobile, Sprint, and AT&T were unable to participate. Also, Rick Carlisle spoke, but was booed a lot because he constantly cussed, using F-Bombs, S-Bombs, and such.

Overall it was a mostly pan-Christian message of how to succeed in business, sales, and leadership. It ended with Tony Romo, who actually had one of the most powerful messages of the conference. He told us, when asked about what career goals will mean the most to him, when speaking of his records, that when you are 80, only 3 things will matter. Those three things are, were you a good husband, were you a good father, and are you going to make it to heaven.

If you are interested in going to the LEAD AND SUCCEED 2013 conference, there are 2 more left, one on the west coast and one on the east coast, and with the links I am providing, you can get in at my discounted rate:

NOVEMBER 13th LEAD AND SUCCEED 2013 in TAMPA BAY, FL


NOVEMBER 26th LEAD AND SUCCEED 2013 in SAN DIEGO, CA


Also, since I went, I am able to go to the following upcoming Dallas conferences at the VIP discounted rate, so I wanted to pass the links to share my discounted rates with you:. If you live outside of the DFW Metroplex and are interested in these conferences, click the links anyway and find ones that may be close to your location. There are events in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, California, Texas, and other states as well!

November 2nd-3rd & 8th-10th 
TNT TRADING Seminars in DALLAS, TX


November 8th-10th & 15th-17th 
FINANCIAL EDGE Workshops in ARLINGTON, TX


November 15th-17th & 22nd-24th 
SECRETS OF AN AUCTION MILLIONAIRE Workshops in SOUTHLAKE, TX


November 22nd-24th & December 6th-8th 
MILLIONAIRE MIND INTENSIVE Workshops in IRVING, TX



28 October 2013

HOW TO: Address Orthodox Christian Clergy

 When we address Deacons or Presbyters (Priests), we should use the honorific, "Father." Bishops we should address as "Your Grace." Though all Bishops (including Patriarchs) are equal in the Orthodox Church, they do have different administrative duties and honors that accrue to their rank in this sense. Thus, "Your Eminence" is the proper honorific for Bishops with suffragans or assistant Bishops, Metropolitans, and most Archbishops (among the exceptions to this rule is the Archbishop of Athens, who is addressed as "Your Beatitude"). "Your Beatitude" is the proper honorific for Patriarchs. When we approach an Orthodox Presbyter or Bishop, we (if a monastic: make a bow by reaching down and touching the floor with our right hand), place our right hand over the left (palms upward), and say: "Father, Bless," (or "Bless, Your Grace," or "Bless, Your Eminence," etc.). The Priest or Bishop then answers, "May the Lord bless you," blesses us with the Sign of the Cross, and places his right hand in our hands. We kiss then his hand. It is, however, correct to kiss the hand of a Deacon, just as we do that of an Abbot (even if not a Priest) or Abbess of a monastery or a revered monastic, out of respect or as a sign of dedication.

We should understand that when the Priest or Bishop blesses us, he forms his fingers to represent the Christogram "ICXC" a traditional abbreviation of the Greek words for "Jesus Christ" (i.e., the first and last letters of each of the words "IHCOYC XRICTOC"). Thus, the Priest's blessing is in the Name of Christ, as he emphasizes in his response to the believer's request for a blessing. Other responses to this request are used by many clergy, but the antiquity and symbolism of the tradition which we have presented are compelling arguments for its use. We should also note that the reason that a lay person kisses the hand of a Priest or Bishop is to show respect to his Apostolic office. More importantly, however, since both (as well as the deacon) hold the Holy Mysteries in their hands during the Divine Liturgy, we show respect to the Holy Eucharist when we kiss their hands. In fact, Saint John Chrysostomos once said that if one were to meet an Orthodox Priest walking along with an Angel, that he should greet the Priest first and kiss his hand, since that hand has touched the Body and Blood of our Lord. While a Deacon in the Orthodox Church holds the first level of the Priesthood (Deacon, Presbyter, Bishop), his service does not entail blessing the Mysteries. When we take leave of a Priest or Bishop, we should again ask for a blessing, just as we did when we first greeted him. 

In the case of married clergy, the wife of a Priest or Deacon is also informally addressed with a title. Since the Mystery of Marriage binds a Priest and his wife together as "one flesh," [Genesis 2:24; St. Matthew 19:6; St. Mark 10:8.] the wife shares in a sense her husband's Priesthood. This does not, of course, mean that she has the very Grace of the Priesthood or its office, but the dignity of her husband's service certainly accrues to her. [See: A Guide to Orthodox Life] The various titles used by the national Churches are listed below. The Greek titles, since they have English correspondents, are perhaps the easiest to use in the West:


  • Greek: Presbytera (Pres-vee-té-ra)
  • Russian: Matushka (Má-toosh-ka)
  • Serbian: Papadiya (Pa-pá-dee-ya)
  • Ukrainian: Panimatushka (Pa-nee-má-toosh-ka), or Panimatka (Pa-nee-mát-ka)

The wife of a Deacon is called "Diakonissa [Thee-a-kó-nees-sa]" in Greek. The Slavic Churches commonly use the same title for the wife of a Deacon as they do for the wife of a Priest. In any case, the wife of a Priest should normally be addressed with both her title and her name in informal situations (e.g., "Presbytera Mary," "Diakonissa Sophia," etc.). 

Whenever you speak to Orthodox clergy of Priestly rank on the telephone, you should always begin your conversation by asking for a blessing: "Father, bless." When speaking with a Bishop, you should say "Bless, Despota [Thés-po-ta]" (or "Vladika [Vlá-dee-ka], Bless" in Slavonic, "Master, Bless" in English). It is also appropriate to say, "Bless, Your Grace" (or "Your Eminence," etc.). You should end your conversation by asking for a blessing again. 

When we write to a clergyman (and, by custom, monastics), we should open our letter with the greeting, " Father, Bless." At the end of the letter, it is customary to close with the following line: "Kissing your right hand...." It is not appropriate to invoke a blessing on a clergyman, as many do: "May God bless you." Not only does this show a certain spiritual arrogance before the image of the cleric, but laymen do not have the Grace of the Priesthood and the prerogative to bless in their stead. Even a Priest properly introduces his letters with the words, "The blessing of the Lord" or "May God bless you," rather than offering his own blessing. Though he can do the latter, humility prevails in his behavīor, too. Needless to say, when a clergyman writes to his ecclesiastical superior, he should ask for a blessing and not bestow one. 

Deacons in the Orthodox Church are addressed in writing as "The Reverend Deacon," if they are married Deacons. If they are Deacons who are also monks, they are addressed as "The Reverend Hierodeacon." If a Deacon holds the honor of Archdeacon or Protodeacon, he is addressed as "The Reverend Archdeacon" or "The Reverend Protodeacon." Deacons hold a rank in the Priesthood and are, therefore, not laymen. This is an important point to remember, since so many Orthodox here in America have come to think of the Deacon as a kind of "quasi-Priest." This is the result of Latin influence and poor teaching. As members of the Priesthood, Deacons must be addressed, as we noted above, as "Father". 

Orthodox Priests are addressed in writing as "The Reverend Presbyter (or Priest)," if they are married Priests. If they are Hieromonks (monks who are also Priests), they are addressed as "The Reverend Hieromonk." Priests with special honors are addressed in this manner: an Archimandrite (the highest monastic rank below that of Bishop), "The Very Reverend Archimandrite" (or, in the Slavic jurisdictions, "The Right Reverend Archimandrite"); and Protopresbyters, "The Very Reverend Protopresbyter." In personal, verbal address, as we noted above, all Priests are called "Father," usually followed by their first names (e.g., "Father John"). 

Bishops in the Orthodox Church are addressed in writing as "The Right Reverend Bishop," followed by their first name (e.g., "The Right Reverend Bishop John"). Archbishops, Metropolitans, and Patriarchs are addressed as "The Most Reverend Archbishop" ("Metropolitan," or "Patriarch"). Because they are also monastics, all ranks of Archpastors (Bishops, Archbishops, Metropolitans, or Patriarchs) are addressed by their first names or first names and sees (e.g., "Bishop John of San Francisco"). It is not correct to use the family name of a Bishop—or any monastic for that matter. Though many monastics and Bishops use their family names, even in Orthodox countries like Russia and Greece, this is absolutely improper and a violation of an ancient Church custom. 

All male monastics in the Orthodox Church are called "Father," whether they hold the Priesthood or not, and are formally addressed in writing as "Monk (name)," if they do not have a Priestly rank. If they are of Priestly rank, they are formally addressed in writing as "Hieromonk" or "Hierodeacon" (see above). Monastics are some-times addressed in writing according to their monastic rank; for example, "Rasophore—monk (name)," "Stavrophore—monk (name)," or "Schemamonk (name)." The Abbot of a monastery is addressed as "The Very Reverend Abbot," whether he holds Priestly rank or not and whether or not he is an Archimandrite by rank. Under no circumstances whatsoever is an Orthodox monk addressed by laymen as "Brother." This is a Latin custom. The term "Brother" is used in Orthodox monasteries in two instances only: first, to designate beginners in the monastic life (novices or, in Greek, dokimoi ["those being tested"]), who are given a blessing, in the strictest tradition, to wear only the inner cassock and a monastic cap; and second, as an occasional, informal form of address between monastics themselves (including Bishops). 

Again, as we noted above, a monk should never use his last name. This reflects the Orthodox understanding of monasticism, in which the monastic dies to his former self and abandons all that identified him in the world. Lay people are also called to respect a monk's death to his past. (In Greek practice, a monk sometimes forms a new last name from the name of his monastery. Thus a monk from the Saint Gregory Palamas Monastery [Mone Agiou Gregoriou Palama, in Greek] might take the name Agiogregorites.) 

The titles which we have used for male monastics also apply to female monastics. In fact, a community of female monastics is often called a "monastery" rather than a convent (though there is nothing improper, as some wrongly claim, in calling a monastery for women a "convent"), just as the word "convent," in its strictest meaning, can apply to a monastic community of males, too. Women monastics are formally addressed in writing as "Nun (name)" or "Rasophore—nun (name)," etc., and the Abbess of a convent is addressed as "The Very Reverend Abbess." Though traditions for informal address vary, in most places, any monastic above the rank of Rasophore is called "Mother." Novices are addressed as "Sister." 

There are, as we have noted, some differences in the way that Orthodox religious are addressed. What we have given above corresponds to a reasonably standardized vocabulary as one would find it in more traditional English—language Orthodox writings and among English—speaking Orthodox monastics.


25 October 2013

Top 5 Green Bay Packers Players and Coaches of All Time

Over the last year, I have seen many top 5 lists of Green Bay Packers, but here is my opinion. The top 5 needs to be a top 5 of only players and then top 5 of coaches that includes players who were coaches. The coaches may not have been the best coaches, but they were coaches and a top player, so they go on the coach list. After the 5, I will add an honorable mention, as they are a close contender for a top-5 position. I will not number the top 5, because it is too close to call. I list them in order of when they started their earliest position. I only list players who played 5 years or more for the Green Bay Packers, as many greats played for less, but to me, they needed to play 5 years to be all-time greats. I also will not list Quarterback Aaron Rodgers (who is a 3 time Pro Bowler (2009, 2011, 2012), an AP First-Team All-Pro (2011), an AP Second-Team All-Pro (2012), an AP NFL MVP (2011), a PFWA NFL MVP (2011), a Super Bowl champion (XLV), a Super Bowl MVP (XLV), the FedEx Air NFL Player of the Year (2010), and the Associated Press Athlete of the Year (2011)) or Head Coach Mike McCarthy (who is a Superbowl champion in 2010(XLV) and NFC Champion (2010)), because they are still playing and coaching, respectively. However, after they retire, they will definitely go on this list, unfortunately knocking someone off.

Top 5 Non-Coaching Players

  • Johnny "Blood" McNally (played Halfback 1929-1936) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963. He also played for the Milwaukee Badgers, Duluth Eskimos, Pottsville Maroons, Pittsburgh Pirates (now Steelers), and Buffalo Tigers. He wore numbers 14, 20, 24, 26, and 55 as a Green Bay Packer. He is a 4 time NFL champion (1929, 1930, 1931, and 1936) and a member of the NFL 1930s All-Decade Team.
  • Paul Hornung (played Halfback 1957-1966) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1986. He had his #5 unofficially retired by the Green Bay Packers in 1967. He is a 2 time Pro Bowl selection (1959, 1960), 2 time first-team All-Pro (1960, 1961), 4 time NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965, and 1966), a Super Bowl Champion (I), a member of the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, a NFL MVP (1961), and recipient of the Bert Bell Award (1961)
  • Ray Nitschke (played Linebacker 1958-1972) Entered the Pro Football  Hall of Fame in 1978. He had his #66 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 1983. He is a Pro Bowl selection (1964), a 3 time First-team All-Pro selection (1964, 1965, 1966, a 4 time Second-team All-Pro selection (1962, 1963, 1967, 1969), a 3 time NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965), a 2 time Super Bowl Champion (I, II), the MVP of 1962 NFL Championship Game, a member of the NFL 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team
  • Brett Favre (played Quarterback 1992-2007) Likely will enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015. He will likely have his #4 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 2014. He also played for the Atlanta Falcons, New York Jets, and Minnesota Vikings. He is a 11 time Pro Bowl selection (1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009), 3 time AP First-Team All-Pro (1995, 1996, 1997), 3 time AP Second-Team All-Pro (2001, 2002, 2007), 3 time AP NFL MVP (1995–1997), 5 time NFC Player of the Year (1995, 1996, 1997, 2002, 2007), 2 time NFC Champion (1996, 1997), a Super Bowl champion (XXXI), and a member of the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team.
  • Reggie White (played Defensive Tackle & Defensive End 1993-1998) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2006. He had his #92 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 2005. He also played for the Memphis Showboats, the Philadelphia Eagles, and Carolina Panthers. He is Rated #7 NFL Player of all-time by NFL.com, a 13 time Pro Bowl selection (1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998), a 10 time First-Team All-Pro selection (1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1998), a 3 time Second-Team All-Pro selection (1994, 1996, 1997), a Super Bowl champion (XXXI), a 2 time NFL Defensive Player of the Year (1987, 1998), a 3 time UPI NFC Defensive Player of the Year (1987, 1991, 1995), a 2 time NFL sacks leader (1987, 1988), a1986 Pro Bowl MVP, and a member of the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, and the NFL 1980s All-Decade Team.
  • HONORABLE MENTION: Jim Taylor (played Fullback 1958-1962) Entered the Pro Football  Hall of Fame in 1976. He also played for the New Orleans Saints. He had his #31 retired by the NEw Orleans Saints. He is a 5 time Pro Bowl selection (1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964), a 6 time All-Pro selection (1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966), a 3 time NFL champion (1961, 1962, 1965), a Super Bowl champion (I), an AP NFL MVP (1962), and a member of the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team

Top 5 Coaches & Players that Coached

  • Earl "Curly" Lambeau (played Halfback 1919-1929 & Head Coach 1919-1949) Entered the Pro Football  all of Fame in 1963. He is expected to have his #1 retired by the Green Bay Packers in the future. He also coached the Chicago Cardinals and the Washington Redskins. He is a winner of the 1929, 1930, 1931, 1936, 1939, & 1944 NFL Championship, and is a member of the NFL 1920s All-Decade Team.
  • Don Hutson (played Split End, Safety, & Kicker 1935-1945 & Assistant Coach 1944-1948) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1963. He had his #14 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 1951. He is a 8× First-Team All-Pro (1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945), a 4 time Pro Bowl selection (1939-1942), a 3 time NFL Champion (1936, 1939, 1944), he is Rated #9 NFL player of all-time by NFL.com, he is a member of the NFL 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and the NFL 1930s All-Decade Team, he is also a 2 time NFL MVP (1941, 1942). He holds the NFL record most seasons leading the league in touchdowns (9) and the Green Bay Packers all-time leading Touchdown receptions leader with 99.
  • Bart Starr (played Quarterback 1956-1971 & Head Coach 1975-1983) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977. He had his #15 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 1973. He is a 4 time Pro Bowl selection (1960, 1961, 1962, 1966), an AP First-Team All-Pro (1966), a 2 time AP Second-Team All-Pro (1962, 1964), the 1966 NFL MVP (AP, NEA, SN, UPI), the "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year (1966), a 5 time NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, 1967), a 2 time  Super Bowl champion (I, II), a 2 time Super Bowl MVP (I, II), a member of the NFL 1960s, and is Rated the #51 NFL Player of all-time by NFL.com
  • Vince Lombardi (Head Coach 1959-1967) Entered the NFL Hall of Fame in 1971. He also coached the New York Giants and the Washington Redskins. He is a 4 time Pro Bowl selection (1960, 1961, 1962, 1966), a AP First-Team All-Pro selection (1966), a 2 time AP Second-Team All-Pro selection (1962, 1964), an AP NFL MVP (1966), a UPI NFL MVP (1966), a NEA NFL MVP (1966), the "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year (1966), a 3 time NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965), a 2 time Super Bowl champion (I, II), a 2 time Super Bowl MVP (I, II), a member of the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, and he is Rated #51 NFL Player of all-time by NFL.com
  • Mike Holmgren (Head Coach 1992-1998) Likely will enter the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014. He also coached the San Francisco 49ers and Seattle Seahawks. He is a Super Bowl winner in 1996 (XXXI) and won the NFC championship in NFC (1996, 1997, 2005)
  • HONORABLE MENTION: Forrest Gregg (played Offensive Tackle 1956-1970 & Head Coach 1984-1987) Entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977. He also played for the Dallas Cowboys and coached for the San Diego Chargers, Cleveland Browns, Toronto Argonauts, Cincinnati Bengals, and Shreveport Pirates. He is a 6 time NFL Champion (1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1971), a 3 time Super Bowl Champion (I, II, VI), a 9 time Pro Bowl selection (1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1968), a 7 time AP First-team All-Pro selection (1960, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967), a 1 time AP Second-team All-Pro selection (1959), a member of the NFL 50th Anniversary All-Time Team, the NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, and the NFL 1960s All-Decade Team.
While I believe this list is definitive, the only other person that some Packers fans might say belongs on this list is Tony Canadeo (played Halfback 1941-1952). Entered the Pro Football  Hall of Fame in 1974. He had his #3 retired by the Green Bay Packers in 1952. He is a First-Team All-Pro selection (1943), a NFL Champion (1944), and a NFL 1940s All-Decade Team

But any way that you slice it, Tony Canadeo, Aaron Rodgers, Mike McCarthy, Forrest Gregg, Mike Holmgren, Vince Lombardi, Bart Starr, Don Hutson, Curly Lambeau, Jim Taylor, Reggie White, Brett Favre, Ray Nitschke, Paul Hornung, and Johnny Blood are definitely the 15 most important figures in the last 94 years of the Green Bay Packers American Football Club's history in the National Football League (NFL) since 1919 AD.

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